Admire The Survivors

Uintah Basin Healthcare, Urban Tulip Studios and Ooh LaLa & Friends invite you to “Admire The Survivors” as we feature six local breast cancer survivors and celebrate all fighters and survivors here in the Basin to raise awareness for breast cancer. The purpose of this campaign is to both educate women on the importance of preventative screenings, and to inspire other women to feel comfortable in their own skin.

If you have experienced cancer or anything that caused your body to look different from how society says we should look, we challenge you to follow these brave, strong women and showcase your beauty. 

 
Did you know… in 2020, an estimated 276,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women. At this time there are more than 3.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Early detection is key. To view guidelines from the American Cancer Society, click here.
 
Breast cancer is sometimes found after symptoms appear, but many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. This is why regular breast cancer screening including breast self-exams, clinical breast exams and mammograms are so important. Call to schedule your annual check-up today. (Women’s Health: 435.722.4652 or 435.781.2030  I  Women’s Imaging for Mammography: 435.725.2081)
 
DID U KNOW? We now offer Cancer Care Services. From chemotherapy to care planning, you’ll receive individualized support from our local cancer care team and Intermountain Healthcare oncologists via telehealth. Learn more!
 
Learn more about the cancer journey stories of these six incredible women…

Lynzi Clark, Roosevelt

My name is Lynzi Clark, I am 36 years old and have been cancer free for 6 years. I am married to Sean and have 3 kids, Mayci (10), Max (8), and Olive (2). [read more]

My name is Lynzi Clark, I am 36 years old and have been cancer free for 6 years. I am married to Sean and have 3 kids, Mayci (10), Max (8), and Olive (2). 

I was diagnosed shortly after I turned 30 when I got done breastfeeding my 2nd child.  I had what was thought to be an infection. I had 5 clear ultrasounds, a clear mammogram and a MRI that confirmed the suspected infection. It wasn’t until the biopsy that we found cancer.  It was a shock to us all. I had excellent care from Dr. Nolte who got me on my way to Huntsman and was a support from there forward. 

I don’t have a family history of breast cancer, I was young, active and 10 years under mammogram age.   I didn’t feel like it would happen to me.  I had a double mastectomy less than 3 weeks after my diagnosis.  Cancer was found in 27 of my 29 slides of breast tissue. Recovery was rough with a 3-year old and a 1-year old; not being able to pick them up and hold them was the worst.  Luckily, I had parents who basically lived with us to help with the kids through those tough times. I have had a total of 4 surgeries with reconstruction. 

Fast forward to today, I have had a few scares requiring scans and such sincebut overall it’s all in the past. I feel great and am so grateful for my health.  I ran my bucket list full marathon a little over a year after my diagnosis and have done everything I can to keep my body in shape to hopefully protect it.  My husband was diagnosed with Stage 4 Hodgkins Lymphoma 3 years after my breast cancer diagnosis. We got through that and were able to have our baby Olive and finally complete our family. We definitely know to embrace and enjoy the good times.  

Cancer changes you.  It changes your family and your outlook on what’s important. Health is truly everything. Exam yourself. You are your own best checker. Don’t put off your mammogram or yearly exams, just go. It can happen to anyone and my heart goes out to all those fighting, the survivors, and those who have passed. 

Dinah Peltier, Fort Duchesne

My survivor story is so simple when compared to the stories of other survivors I have met during my cancer journey... [read more]

My survivor story is so simple when compared to the stories of other survivors I have met during my cancer journey.

I was diagnosed with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) in the fall of 2014. My cancer was detected by my yearly mammogram AFTER having a clean yearly breast exam. A special thank you to Dr. Sean Paulsen.

I received this diagnosis after I had retired with plans to start enjoying life and all these plans had to be put on hold. I met with the Oncologist to plan for radiation treatment and I told him I had to finish the treatment before the second weekend of March in time for the Las Vegas NASCAR race. He did some calculations and I started radiation treatment on January 17, 2015, and I did finish in time for therace. Unfortunately, after all that planning with my oncologist, my favorite driver did not win.

As part of my treatment protocol, it was recommended that I take Tamoxifen for 5 years immediately following radiation treatment. I opted not to do so after research and discussion with my oncologist.

Looking back at my cancer journey, I feel like it was so easy and simple for several reasons. My cancer was caught early before it had a chance to spread. I went through radiation treatment without any pain or discomfort. I had an Oncologist who agreed with my decision to not take Tamoxifen. I will never forget all the wonderful people, especially the amazing survivors, that I met along the way. These are my reasons why my story is so easy and simple.

Do I want to go through this again?  NO. Will I keep up with my yearly mammograms? YES.

Beckie Ann Allred, Vernal

When I was 61, I received a bump to my right breast (thanks to my dear grandson). The area he bumped was so painful that I went to my doctor and he advised a mammogram... [read more]

When I was 61, I received a bump to my right breast (thanks to my dear grandson). The area he bumped was so painful that I went to my doctor and he advised a mammogram. Although I had always had regular mammograms, I chose to trust Uintah Basin Medical Center. I viewed my mammogram and knew in my heart it was not good news for me. I then immediately had the lump biopsied.

With each passing day I felt as if my life was slowing closing in.  Finally, my doctor gave me the results. He said, “You have breast cancer.” I felt as if my heart stopped! My dear husband had to help me absorb and deal with the awful news! That was a terribly, painful day for my family and I.

We chose Huntsman Cancer Center where I was diagnosed with Invasive Ductile Carcinoma – stage 3A. My treatment plan started with 4.5 months of chemotherapy followed by partial removal of the breast and 5 lymph nodes.  I then spent the next month and a half receiving radiation.

Ladies, I just have to say that with God, a good and loving family, and a prayer support group, that all things are possible!!! Today I am nearly 64 and happy to report one full year cancer free!!! Get your Mammograms!

Nicole Iorg, Lapoint

I am happily married and am a mom to 4 and a grandma to 9. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 2003. I did not feel a lump .… [read more]

I am happily married and am a mom to 4 and a grandma to 9. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 2003. I did not feel a lump. I didn’t feel pain. I just happened to decide to get a Baseline mammogram. I had a lumpectomy and a lymph node disection and all the nodes had cancer.   I was just about to turn 36.

 I cannot tell you how many people reached out to help our family. It was such a humbling experience. I am so grateful for friends, strangers and especially my family that stepped in and helped me survive.  I still feel a tingle in my heart just thinking about it. Laughter is a key ingredient to help you get through. My youngest was just starting kindergarten when I was diagnosed. I couldn’t leave my family. I could not have done it without all the help and prayers I received. I am a survivor and I hope I give other people encouragement to keep fighting. All my love, Nicole Iorg

Kim Rojas, Roosevelt

The most important advice I can share is to get your mammogram!I am here today to share my story because of a routine mammogram.I had no symptoms and no detectable lump.… [read more]

The most important advice I can share is to get your mammogram!I am here today to share my story because of a routine mammogram.I had no symptoms and no detectable lump.  What I did have was breast cancer.

It is a humbling surreal experience. I had a biopsy and fully expected an all clear but that’s not what happened.I ended up being diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer and I had a lumpectomy and made the difficult decision to undergo chemotherapy and radiation.It was brutal and all I can say is I am so blessed to be here alive everyday  to see the sunrise and set.

So, ladies toughen up and go get those mammograms and let’s enjoy our lives and be grateful we have such amazing medical care available to us in the day and age.We can only beat cancer if we can detect it. Love and support each other 

Courtney Theener, Altamont

My name is Courtney and I live in Altamont, Utah. I am married and have four children ages 18, 15, 13, and 10. I was diagnosed on January 21, 2020 with invasive ductal carcinoma, two weeks after my 40th birthday… [read more]

 My name is Courtney and I live in Altamont, Utah. I am married and have four children ages 18, 15, 13, and 10. I was diagnosed on January 21, 2020 with invasive ductal carcinoma, two weeks after my 40th birthday.

I have worked for Uintah Basin Healthcare for 20 years. UBH offers free annual mammograms for all employees beginning at age 40. I work in the Radiology Department and had just turned 40, so I went to get my free mammogram and catch up with coworkers. Instead, those coworkers ended up giving me the news that would change my life forever.

One out of every eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 10% of those will be under the age of 40. So, I basically won some sort of unfortunate lottery!

I had recently had a breast examination with Dr. John Nolte. If I had not had a mammogram, my cancer would not have been detectable by palpation for a year or more and by then it would have been too late. Early detection saved my life.

What happened next was a whirlwind of doctor appointments at the Huntsman, more imaging including an MRI, and more biopsies. I work in healthcare and I was scared. I know what all the big words mean and what I was possibly facing. My mind went to the worst possible scenario and I was trying to calculate how much time I needed to finish raising my kids to be decent human beings!

Because my cancer was caught so early when the cancer was small and had not spread to lymph nodes, my treatment did not require chemotherapy. I opted to have a mastectomy to avoid radiation. Cancer is hard in and of itself, but then combine that with a worldwide pandemic, and it is even harder. I have had to go to most of my appointments alone in a mask with doctors and nurses in masks where all I can see are their eyes. I can’t see their welcoming smiles or their facial expressions letting me know that I am going to be okay.

I cannot call myself a survivor yet, because I am still in the reconstruction process, but it was an honor to stand with these women who have fought hard battles. I would like to thank UBH for this opportunity to tell my story and for the employee health program. Who knows when I would have gone in for a mammogram! I would also like to thank Dr. Sean Paulsen for being my second opinion and for talking me off a ledge more times than I can count. These are tough decisions to have to make at 40 and I appreciate his knowledge in helping me decide what course of treatment was best for me. There is a chance my cancer will come back, there is a chance it won’t, but I won’t take even one day for granted. Tomorrow is not promised. Please don’t hesitate or delay getting a mammogram. Early detection is key!

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